The Orange Slate

| simpler is more |
Books

Spring 2016 Book Stack.

May 11, 2016

Spring_2016_Book-Stack

My reading list over the past couple of years has been sloooowwww going. But recently, I signed up for my library card at the new-to-us local library and discovered that they had a huge selection of e-books. (Welcome to the 21st century, Emily, I know, I know.)

So during bed-rest and now during nighttime feedings I’m attempting to make up for some lost time. Here are the titles that have been stacking up on my table (and screen) lately.

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart. This was such a strange book. It draws you in like any ordinary cute, light summer novel does and then throws some huge curve-balls. Maybe I’m just not used to the genre, but this book definitely left me sleepless – not quite the effect I was hoping for! But I was able to finish it in just a few days, so if you want some quick, easy airplane reading, this is it. If you can’t handle mildly scary or bizarre though – pass it up.

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying up by Marie Kondo. This was both more interesting and a little weirder than I expected. I appreciated her de-cluttering tips, although I think my mom and sister and I have all been secret KonMari practitioners before Kondo invented the system. Her advice definitely inspired me to go back through my closet, my most consistent source of clutter-stress. I also loved her advice regarding keeping items out of obligation or guilt.

I got the feeling that Ms. Kondo has some lingering inner-child issues – she seemed to spend a lot of time painting a picture of herself as this reclusive anomaly of a child who basically raised herself. Also, I would love to know what kind of advice she gives to parents when she consults with them. Do the piles of plastic sippy cups in my cupboard bring me joy? Not exactly. But neither does the idea of my toddler drinking out of adult glasses……

Simplicity Parenting by Kim John Payne. This book was life-changing for me. I’ve been a theoretical fan of Waldorf parenting and educational approaches, but this author explained why. I couldn’t stop scribbling quotes. It was both convicting and inspiring to read. It’s definitely super helpful for parents, but even someone without children trying to simply and more intentionally could glean quite a lot from the author’s words.

Yes, Please by Amy Poehler. This is mostly just hysterically funny. It makes for some great middle-of-the-night light-hearted reading, although it feels less like a real book and more like a show – or a blog – or something? This is probably partly because o Amy stand-up comedy career and partly because so much of the book is designed to look like post-it notes or letters or notes from a set. In addition to piles of hilarity, Poehler has some truly wonderful insights on parenting and life.

Every Good Endeavor by Tim Keller. Mark and I have been reading through this together. It’s quite good and includes a lot of really convicting discussion. It’s one of those books digested most easily at a slow pace which works perfectly since we only read a bit each night. I think it would be a lot to take in quickly. If you’re looking for some career direction or rationale for decisions, start here. Keller provides some wonderful starting points.

I would love some suggestions! What titles are on your summer reading list?

Only registered users can comment.

Comments are closed.