Food

A Late Summer Egg and Potato Salad

August 3, 2017

   Egg and Potato Salad Recipe

Egg and Potato Salad Recipe 2

The title of this post could be “It’s just too dang hot” or “Eating without Cooking: A Summer Campaign”

It’s HOT now. That’s 85-90 temperature range where we were hovering last month? Psh. For amateurs. Our heat index is hovering near 110 every day. It’s above 90 by 10:30 a.m. IT’S HOT, FOLKS.

Did I mention that our AC completely died at 10:00 a.m. a few weeks ago, on one of the hottest days yet, as Mark lay trapped on the couch with a broken ankle waiting for surgery and I stared at two toddlers, innocently waiting for me to serve their every need and entertain their every whim.

Now I know EXACTLY how the pioneers felt. All we needed was a bear scratching at the window to complete the picture.

Egg and Potato Salad Recipe 3

My point is, I feel like turning on the oven, at this point, is simply tempting fate. It’s just too hot. I don’t want to add extra heat, or touch anything hot, or eat anything hot (grill excepted). Also, did I mention that Mark has a broken ankle? He’s recovering from surgery nicely, but he’s supposed to keep all weight off of his foot which means that dinner time finds me – solo. Very solo. Not the eating part, just the cooking and cleaning part, which can be tricky.

SO. Bring on all of the Pinterest boards and Instagram feeds with pretty food that looks like it doesn’t require cooking and makes me feel cool and is easy to clean up. Bonus points for leftovers.

The Kinfolk cookbook and the July editions of Bon Appetit and Real Simple have been great resources for low-fuss, low-indoor-heat recipes over the past couple of weeks.

Also? BRING ON ALL OF THE SALADS. We are basically subsisting on protein-packed salads at this point. This one was a total winner. Healthy? Check. Easy? Check. Possible to re-create for leftovers without too much hassle? Check. Instagrammable? Check Check. Miles and Violet even ate bits of it (although hard-boiled eggs are not their favorites, but adding pesto has helped encourage them over this hump in the past. As has making something completely different, like a hot dog. #lazymomdontcare)

Here’s the only salad you may ever need again during these dog-day months. Dinner will be extra simple if this is eaten outside. 

  Egg and Potato Salad Recipe 1

Egg and Potato Salad Recipe 4

Ingredients

3 hard-boiled eggs

2 cups leafy greens (kale, at least by itself, is going to be too hefty. Mix in some spinach, arugula, butter lettuce – you get the picture).

1/2 lb little pretty potatoes (steakhouse will work)

Generous handful of cilantro

2 tbl chopped dill (ish)

3 stalks of chives

This dressing

Pepper

Coarsely ground sea salt

Assembly

Bring a pot of water to a boil. Boil the potatoes for about 20 minutes (depending on their size – mine were steakhouse and 20 worked well). Let the potatoes cool. (This is a good time to peel your hard-boiled eggs). Wash all of the produce and pat dry. Distribute the leafy greens between two plates. Slice the potatoes thinly in half, quarters, rounds, thirds – whatever makes sense visually for the size and shape of your potatoes and distribute over the greens. The point is to spread out the “potato-y-ness” and expose the texture inside.

Slice the peeled hard-boiled eggs and arrange over the potatoes.. Toss chives, cilantro, and dill generously over the plate. Add a small sprinkle of coarse sea salt (one or two quick twists of the grinder should do the trick) and a bit of pepper. 

The salads can chill like this for a bit if you’re not ready to eat. When you’re ready to eat, add the dressing – don’t be stingy. Enjoy!

 

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Life

An Apartment Patio Garden.

April 13, 2015

 Patio Garden | The Orange Slate2

Patio Garden | The Orange Slate3

When we moved south and into our current apartment, I was particularly excited about trying a potted garden. I’ve tried to grow the occasional potted herb, with varying and unexciting success.

When we lived in our last house in D.C., we planted a few ground plants, but I kept my potted herbs inside on the windowsill (where they didn’t flourish in the least) because, although we had a small yard and porch, we lived in a very urban area with a lot of foot-traffic at all hours of the day and night. The idea of eating herbs that had been exposed to our street always made me a little nervous.

Patio Garden |The Orange Slate1

Patio Garden |The Orange Slate2

This year, I was excited to give gardening a real effort and eat the fruits of my labors. We have a narrow catwalk  and I knew that growing anything in the space would require a little bit of space strategy.

It warms up early in Texas and so a weekend afternoon in March found me in the garden department of Home Depot. After a lot of brainstorming and help from Pinterest, and arranging plants in pots and then rearranging (and with a lot of help from Miles) I ended up planting two flower-pots and three herbs. They fill all of the extra corners on our catwalk, but there is still room for a bench and so now we have a mini patio area.

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Patio Garden | The Orange Slate4

Even though garden is tiny, we’re already using the herbs (basil, rosemary, and oregano) in our meals on an almost daily basis, which makes me way too excited.

The flowers (impatiens, mums, and a Gerbera daisy) seem to be doing great*. Our catwalk has a nice full view of the sun for about 1/3 of the day and nice shade for 2/3, so I think I just lucked out with an ideal location (although sometimes the impatiens seem to get a little wilty in the afternoon if I don’t remember to scoot them back into the shade), but I’ll credit my black-thumb-turning green, my obsessive hovering, and the “magic soil” that the Home Depot staff convinced me to buy.

Here’s to gardens and eating what we plant! Tell me about your gardens. Do you have space for a big garden or do you have a patio garden? What do you like to plant?

*Some of these photos were taken on the day I planted and some were taken a few weeks later.

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Life

Weekending And An Herb Garden

July 15, 2013

We enjoyed every ounce of hot sunny summer-ness this weekend. We spent all day on Saturday boating, tubing, paddleboarding, and eating with lovely friends in the general Annapolis vicinity on some small delightful lake. 

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I have sunburns to prove how sunny and wonderful the whole day was. It was one of those fun gatherings of intelligent happy people in which all sorts of random important information comes to light in the midst of vigorous debates, such as the best methods for eating watermelon and how a tomato should be diced for the perfect salsa.

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We concluded our Weekending by planting my new baby herbs in their little chalk-painted pots. This DIY project has been basically consuming my consciousness for a week, so I think Mark and I were both relieved to have it completed.

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It was so easy and gratifying and now I have Cinnamon Basil, Oregano, and Curled Parsley to toss into every dish. Even someone who can't garden, like me, can grow herbs (supposedly).

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Potted Herb Garden

Supplies:

3 small herb plants (from your local gardening store or Home Depot

3 small terra-cotta pots

Chalk spray-paint (You can be really creative and pick a bright shade of chalk-paint)

A sheet 

Some extra soil

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Directions:

Spread the sheet ouside on a lawn or dirt area. Ensure that the three pots are reasonably clean and then place them upside down a foot or two apart on the sheet. Using the spray paint as directed, coat the pots with one layer of spray paint. Allow them to dry for an hour or so. Turn them over so that they are right-side up and coat inside and out with another layer of paint.

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Allow the pots to dry for another hour and then move them to a dry, safe place. Allow them to dry for another 24 hours. Place a 1/4 cup of soil on the bottom of each pot and then place the herbs in their respective pots. Fill the remaining space in the pots with soil and water thoroughly. Chalk the names of the herbs on to the pots for a delightful final touch.

 

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